In darkness the moon is reborn

If we could see the moon today, it would be a very thin crescent only a few degrees from the sun. Tomorrow it’s in new moon phase. Maps created with Stellarium

What’s old today but instantly becomes young again tomorrow? If you guessed the moon, you’re right! Today the moon winds up its current cycle of phases as an exceedingly thin crescent so close to the sun it’s invisible in the solar glare.

The moon’s cycle has always been a metaphor for life. Every month it’s born again as a thin crescent in the western evening sky, grows to a half-pie seven days later and reaches its full power and radiance when full at 14 days. After full, the moon’s radiance declines as its phase wanes to last quarter (21 days) and then to a whiskery crescent at dawn. Before it finally disappears in the sun’s glare, the moon, now 28 days old, reaches the end of its “life” cycle. But only briefly. The very next day, moments after new moon phase, it’s reborn again as an evening crescent.

When we run into troubles in our lives, we might look to the ever-renewing moon for inspiration.

The sky looking west-southwest a half hour after sunset Monday evening Feb. 11, 2013. You might be able to spot dimmer Mars in binoculars.

Tomorrow morning at 2:20 a.m. (CST) the moon will be exactly lined up with the sun and pass through new moon phase. Skywatchers in the western hemisphere won’t see the moon either day because it’s in the same direction as the sun and swamped by glare.

By Monday Feb. 11 however, the moon’s orbital motion will remove it far enough from the sun to be visible during evening twilight. ¬†And there’s a bonus. The crescent will float a few degrees above the planet Mercury.

I’ve removed the atmosphere in this illustration so you can see where the moon is today at noon (CST), tomorrow morning when it reaches new moon phase and tomorrow Feb. 10 at noon. It passes north of the sun, which is in the constellation Capricornus. Notice all the planets in the neighborhood.

If we were to follow the moon today through new moon and into tomorrow, we’d notice it passes well north of the sun. Most of the time, the new moon is either north or south of the sun because its orbit is tipped about 5 degrees relative to Earth’s orbit.

The moon’s tilted orbit causes it to swing north or south (pictured here) of the sun from Earth’s perspective. A couple times a year however it crosses directly in front and a total solar eclipse is visible from somewhere on Earth. Illustration: Bob King

Over the course of its monthly cycle, it bobs up and then down along its tilted orbit. But 2 or 3 times a year, when the moon intersects the plane of Earth’s orbit¬†at the same time as new moon phase, it crosses directly in front of the sun and we see a total solar eclipse. In fact, this is the only time we can see a new moon with the naked eye. It looks exactly like what you’d expect – a blank, black disk scrubbed free of its past life, waiting to begin the next as a tender crescent.

The new moon – black disk – is plainly visible silhouetting the sun during a total solar eclipse. Credit: Luc Viatour

2 thoughts on “In darkness the moon is reborn

  1. Interesting lunar explanations AstroBob. Never realised that our 7-day week was based on the lunar cycle ! That makes sense. You learn something new each day.

  2. I didn’t even know this was going on… I happened to look out my west facing bedroom window to see a sliver of light… I watched it for about 15 minutes…. It was kinda cool… I’ve never actually seen one with my own eyes, I always seen them on tv…

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