Comet 67P/C-G comes alive in 3D – Must see!

Beg, borrow or steal a pair of those cheap 3D red-blue anaglyph glasses and take a look at this photo. It’s made of two different images taken by Rosetta 17 minutes apart from a distance of 65 miles (103 km) on August 7, 2014. For the full effect, click to view the hi-res version. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

I was awestruck looking at this photo with just a pair of cardboard red-blue 3D glasses. Grab your pair and let your eyes climb over the foreground crags and onto the ‘neck’ joining the top and bottom lobes of the comet. A thick blanket of dust appears to cover the area. Did some spill from the spectacular range of cliffs above? And how about the boulders? Did they roll down the same cliffs?

One of the two images used to make the stereo image above. Click to enlarge. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Some of the crater-like depressions in the bulbous foreground lobe are filled with similar but smaller boulders while others liberally pepper the landscape. At front left, check out that huge jagged gash in the comet.

We’ve grown accustomed to detailed, close-up photos of planets and asteroids from our spacecraft and landers, but there’s something about seeing this comet in three dimensions that brings an alien landscape alive. It looks familiar in some respects, but strange and incomprehensible too.

Here are a couple more full-screen variations on the original stereo perspective: 1, 2

I’ve also selectively cropped several areas from the original image:

Boulders protrude from a smoother surface, while at left there appears to be a rockfall at the bottom of a cliff. Could ice flows have been active beneath the dust? Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Eroded crater with a craggy rim. Speculation only, but everything appears to be covered in dust. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Boulders collect on a smooth area of finer debris. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Rugged landscape of possible craters that have morphed in shape from erosion due to vaporizing ice. Rocks/boulders are everywhere! Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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About astrobob

My name is Bob King and I work at the Duluth News Tribune in Duluth, Minn. as a photographer and photo editor. I'm also an amateur astronomer and have been keen on the sky since age 11. My modest credentials include membership in the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) where I'm a regular contributor, International Meteorite Collectors Assn. and Arrowhead Astronomical Society. I also teach community education astronomy classes at our local planetarium.

One thought on “Comet 67P/C-G comes alive in 3D – Must see!

  1. These photos are just fantatstic! The boulder field affected by the comet’s local gravity is a scream. Think of Saint-Exupery’s “The Little Prince”. This little world hurtling through Existance all on its own.

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