19
Aug
2014

Aurora alert tonight Aug. 19-20 for northern U.S.

“Unbelievable,” says Reid Wiseman on seeing a spectacular auroral display from a window on the International Space Station this evening. This photo was tweeted out at 6 p.m. CDT. Credit: NASA/Reid Wiseman

The astronauts are seeing it from the space station. You and I just might too. A G2 moderate auroral storm kicked up this afternoon and early evening, and according to NOAA space weather experts, is expected to continue into the night.

Another shot of the aurora from orbit. “Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine this,” said Wiseman.

A coronal mass ejection (CME) caused by a filament or plume of hydrogen gas ejected a few days ago caused the sudden surge. The Kp index, a reliable indicator of magnetic activity in Earth’s upper atmosphere hit 6 earlier this evening. Should it ‘stick’ there, skywatchers in Canada and across the northern U.S. stand a good chance of seeing auroras tonight. Look to the north at the onset of night. I’ll keep you posted.

* Update 11 p.m. CDT: The Kp has plummeted to 2! That’s not good. It’s always possible that activity will shoot up again overnight. If you’re out tonight, take a look before going to bed.

3 Responses

      1. Profile photo of astrobob

        I hope so Paul. We finally had a mostly clear night tonight and got a super view of Comet Lovejoy near Epsilon Cas. Huge coma and a decent though faint tail in my 37 cm.

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