Venus And Jupiter Bring It On / Aurora Forecast Tonight

A CME shot off the sun during the evening of October 21 seen in this photo made by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Although it shot off to the side, Earth's expected to feel its effects tonight. Credit: NASA/ESA
A CME shot off the sun on the evening of October 21 as seen in this photo made by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Although it shot off to one side, Earth’s expected to feel its effects tonight. Credit: NASA/ESA

The waxing gibbous moon dominates the evening sky, but with luck we may see the aurora tonight. On October 22 the Sun cut loose with a CME or coronal mass ejection that’s expected to side-swipe the planet. A minor G1 storm is expected to start this afternoon and continue overnight. Because of the moonlight, the low northern sky will look like it’s glowing a little to start with, so watch for a distinct arc and rays of light.

Tomorrow morning (Sun. Oct. 25) and Monday morning, Jupiter and Venus will be very close together in the dawn sky. Source: Stellarium
Tomorrow morning (Sun. Oct. 25) and Monday morning, Jupiter and Venus will be very close together in the dawn sky. Source: Stellarium

We have something wonderful in store tomorrow morning. Venus and Jupiter, the two brightest planets, will be in conjunction just a 1° apart in the eastern sky at dawn. Mars, located about 3° further east, will make it a perfect trifecta. You can see them anytime between two hours and 45 minutes before sunrise. If you have a wide open view to the east, Mercury joins the scene about 45 minutes before sunup about 7° high or just under “one fist” above the eastern horizon for a “quadfecta”.

Mercury also joins the trio closer to sunrise. Source: Stellarium
Mercury also joins the trio closer to sunrise. Source: Stellarium

Jupiter and Venus will be nearly the same distance apart on Monday morning, too. Don’t miss the show!

Binocular view of Jupiter and Venus tomorrow morning showing Jupiter's four brightest moons. How many can you see in your pair? Source: Stellarium
Binocular view of Jupiter and Venus tomorrow morning showing Jupiter’s four brightest moons. How many can you see in your pair? Source: Stellarium