The Truth About Astronomy

The sky was mostly cloudy last night despite the optimistic forecast. Keep in mind that Neptune and the Andromeda galaxy will be visible throughout the fall. By the beginning of next week, the moon will make viewing Neptune difficult for a time. I’ll make another map for finding the planet when the sky is moonless again later this month.…
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Neptune In Binoculars? No Way!

So the sky did crack open a few times last night between waves of fast-moving clouds. The stars were very bright in the hazeless air. Finding things in the sky mostly depends on good maps and a little persistence. Everything’s complicated by the spinning of the Earth, which like the classic mother-in-law stereotype, keeps moving the silverware. Over the coming…
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Stridulations In C Major

I know nothing about composing music but given a second life, I’d learn how to do it. Modern classical is my favorite, and I marvel at how composers wring such amazing color and vitality from musical instruments. Music buzzed the air last night, but instead of clarinets and timpani, it was legs, wings and bodies of…
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Beacons To Light The Way Into Deep Space

Venus, Mercury and the crescent moon scrape the western horizon tonight (Sept. 1) at 8 p.m., 15 minutes after sunset. Venus lies three fingers, held out in front of you, above the horizon. The sky will be bright at this time, making the moon and Mercury very difficult to spot. If you don’t find them, you can at…
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Fun At The Furtman Farm

Lively discussion at the breakfast table this morning (August 31) with Ted Pellman, Jon Dannehy, Eric Norland and Bob Greene. How do people on so little sleep continue to talk astronomy nonstop? Three things: passion, coffee and … lack of sleep.  Photo: Bob King I know, I know. I promised you the Andromeda galaxy and Cepheids but…
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