Let The Moon Be Your Light

Balls of crimson fire. That’s what the little maples lining Duluth’s streets look like today. Leaves skitter across the road and fly in your face. It’s absolutely fabulous. Fall’s presence is forceful and relentless. Time to lose a few old leaves myself and get back to essentials. Light from last night’s moon (Oct. 8) turned a…
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The Week’s Been Flying By

Saturn’s moon Enceladus (en-CELL-luh-duss) sports dark, tiger stripe cracks (at bottom) in its icy surface. The Cassini spacecraft has detected geysers of water vapor jetting from these cracks. PHOTO: NASA Things have certainly been flying by this week. First it was the Mercury Messenger spacecraft, then the asteroid 2008 TC3. Now it’s Cassini’s turn. The…
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Lonely Heart Of The Southern Sky

The moon revolves around the Earth once every 27.3 days. As it does, its angle with respect to the sun and Earth constantly changes, causing to go through the familiar phases of crescent to full. Illustration by Minesweeper With clearing skies rolling in tonight, you might consider a stroll in the moonlight. The moon is now between…
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Wha’ Happened?

  So what’s become of 2008 TC3, the only asteroid ever predicted to hit the Earth? As of Tuesday morning, there’s been only one potential sighting by a pilot of a KLM airliner, who observed a brief flash shortly before the predicted impact time last night. An aviation meteorologist at the National Weather Service in…
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INCOMING — Watch Out! / Update

UPDATE 10/6 11 p.m.: A recent image of the asteroid 2008 TC3 taken an hour before predicted impact by Eric Allen of the Observatoire du Cegep de Trois-Rivieres, Champlain, Quebec, Canada and used with permission. The asteroid appears as a series of streaks because it was moving rapidly during each of the 10-second-long time exposures. More info below. Eric…
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