Bonding Through Iridescence

Such a day! It’s unbelievably warm here in Duluth this afternoon. As Larry pointed out in the comments link from yesterday’s blog, the sun is at a similar height in the sky today as it will be again in early February. What do you bet, we’re not going to come close to matching this day…
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Re-entry Update #4 (final)

US Space Command reports that the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) probably reentered Earth’s atmosphere on Nov. 2nd (Sunday) at 10:51 p.m. Central time, with an uncertainty of plus or minus one minute. It would have burned up over the following coordinates: 48° South, 151° East, or south of Tasmania over the Indian Ocean. Remote, unpeopled…
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What Phase Are Your Crabapples In?

Crabapples in sunlight show different phases just like the moon, depending on where the observer stands. At left, the apples are almost between me and the sun so just a sliver of them is lit. At right, the sun is directly off the right, and the apples look like half moons. Photos: Bob King / Duluth…
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Re-entry Update #3 / Geysers By Starlight

I was out looking from 9:35 to 9:55 p.m. tonight, and didn’t see anything burning up overhead except for a few faint meteors. Did you? It’s possible the ammonia tank may have re-entered Earth’s atmosphere unwitnessed. That would happen if it came down during daylight or over the middle of the ocean. No one’s 100% sure yet, so…
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Re-entry Update #2

The best we can do for the re-entry of the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) is 9:46 p.m. tonight Central time, plus or minus 15 hours. Needless to say, that’s a big margin of error! At 9:46, the EAS will be over the Baja Peninsula and heading northeast. If it doesn’t burn up there, it will continue on its…
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