Awesome Iceland aurora time-lapse and a bear claw sunspot


Joe Capra’s recently released time lapse of aurora over Iceland and Greenland

Nice work! Take a peek at Joe Capra’s recent 10-day shoot of the aurora and you’ll be licking your chops to fly to Greenland on the next available plane. Capra used three Canon 5D Mark III cameras with various Canon lenses to shoot hundreds of individual photos that he later stacked into a video. The reflections on ice and water are spectacular.

A low, green aurora in the northern sky on November 19th sparked by a coronal hole. Credit: Bob King

Here in the northern U.S., the aurora’s been snoozing. Even though gusts of solar wind from a leaky coronal hole have tickled Earth’s magnetic domain the past few nights, conditions have remained below storm level. The aurora’s been a constant but quiet presence like the embers of an overnight fire.

More low aurora simmers in the north last night (Nov. 20) around 11 o’clock. The band of northern lights, called the aurora oval, hovers directly over places like Iceland and Greenland, so people there get to see displays nearly every dark night of the year. It takes coronal holes, flares and other kinds of heightened solar activity to expand the oval so skywatchers in lower latitudes get their chance. Credit: Bob King

Expect the same horizon-hugging aurora for the next couple nights as the hole in the Sun’s magnetic canopy continues to send pinging particles our way.

That giant sunspot that’s made it through a second rotation of the Sun has been nothing but a tease when it come to flares. On its return a week ago, the group possessed the magnetic complexity to unleash powerful X-class flares, but so far, all’s been quiet on the solar front.

Sunspot group 2209 (older 2192) mimics a bear claw in this photo taken on November 19th by French amateur astronomer Philippe Tosi with an 8-inch telescope. Earth shown for size. Click to see more of his amazing high-resolution Sun image. Credit: Philippe Tosi

Flares aside, the region makes a great sight in the telescope. Shaped like a bear claw, the main spot in the group still spans more than three Earths. Philippe’s photo beautifully shows the fiber-like texture of the outer penumbra fringing the darker umbras.

Sunspots are cooler regions on the Sun’s surface – the reason they appear darker – where strong magnetic fields insulate those areas from their hotter surroundings. Notice the rice grain texture of the background. Called granules, each one’s about the size of Texas and represents an individual cell of hot solar gas rising from below like bubbles in a pot of boiling water. At the surface, the gas cools and sinks back down along the tiny, dark channels separating one from another. Re-heated, they rise again.

Cloudy? Snowy? That won’t stop you from seeing THIS aurora


Aurora flyover in high-def video from the International Space Station

Wish it had been clear at dawn this morning. Some of us would have seen a very nice aurora. As predicted, Earth’s magnetic bubble got slammed by a package of high-speed solar wind overnight that fired up the northern lights. The impact continues to reverberate with more activity expected tonight.

No matter the weather or circumstance, I think you’ll enjoy this high-definition video taken from the International Space Station. The curls, rolls and flashing purple flames are, well, incredible. And there’s nothing quite like looking down on the aurora from an altitude of 250 miles (402 km). As the camera pans, you’ll also see the delicate green film of airglow, which is distinct from the northern lights – airglow surrounds the entire planet like a membrane around a cell.

Green, streaky airglow seen from the ground on July 22, 2014. Its faint light is half the reason you can always see around on even the darkest nights. The other light is provided by the stars. Credit: Bob King

Ultraviolet light from the daytime sun ionizes or knocks electrons off of oxygen and nitrogen atoms and molecules; at night the electrons recombine with their host atoms, releasing energy as light of different colors including green, red, yellow and blue.  The brightest emission, the one responsible for creating the airglow so often seen in space station nighttime images and videos, stems from excited oxygen atoms beaming emerald green light.

Forget about the clouds and take a ride with the astronauts where it’s forever clear.

Aurora alert tonight through Monday night Nov. 9-10

Aurora smolders beneath the Big Dipper tonight November 9th around 7 p.m. Credit: Bob King

Around 7 p.m. this evening, just before moonrise, a smoky green glow fired up beneath the Big Dipper low in the northern sky. The Moon rose and clouds soon followed, but we might be in for a couple nights of northern lights.

Cirrostratus clouds at moonrise this evening refracted moonlight into a pretty halo. Caught in the semi-circle is the Hyades star cluster (lower right). The Pleiades are at upper right. Credit: Bob King

A coronal mass ejection that launched from the Sun on November 7th will arrive overnight and could produce minor to moderate (G1-G2) geomagnetic storms now through midnight Monday night. The strongest activity is expected between 3-9 a.m. (CST) tomorrow morning.

A blast of high-speed electrons and protons from the Sun on November 7 looks like it may affect Earth overnight and into Monday. Credit: NASA/ESA

Tonight’s little taste will hopefully be a sign of more to come.

Auroras in the north tonight Oct. 14-15

Aurora low in the northern sky around 10:30 p.m. CDT this evening October 14, 2014. Credit: Bob King

Earlier this evening, a glancing blow from a solar blast that left the sun on October 10th jiggled Earth’s magnetic domain to produce a modest display of northern lights. Forecasters originally expected the coronal mass ejection (CME) to miss Earth. My astronomy class and I noticed a low arc in the north as early as 8:30 p.m. A half hour later, the arc broke apart into a beautiful set of evenly-spaced rays across the northern sky.

These slowly faded back to a quiet glow as if the aurora decided to take a nap and then re-brightened about 9:30. Right now at 11 p.m. the display has returned to a quiet arc about 5 degrees above the northern horizon directly below the Big Dipper. Something about it reminds me of a pale green feather boa.

The Kp index, a measure of how magnetically disturbed the upper atmosphere is, hit 5 this afternoon and evening, the mark of a minor geomagnetic storm. Auroras are usually seen across the northern border states when Kp=5. Credit: NOAA

NOAA space weather shows a G1 minor geomagnetic storm underway since the afternoon. Activity may be dropping off now, but it’s hard to say for sure, so keep a lookout for auroras tonight if you live in the northern states and southern Canada. Besides aftereffects of the solar blast, a chance for more auroras will continue the next couple nights due to “solar sector boundary crossings”. These are changes in the direction of the magnetic field within the solar plasma (electron and proton mix) that continually streams from the sun called the solar wind.

Coronal holes spark auroras Sept. 26-27 — more possible next 2 nights

The aurora around 1 a.m. CDT this morning. Curious forms twisted away in the northern sky in the Big Dipper. Details: 20mm lens, f/2.8, ISO 1600, 20-second exposure. Credit: Bob King

I apologize for not sending an alert earlier, but I was away from the computer and out under the sky tonight. Streams of solar wind from openings in the sun’s magnetic canopy called coronal holes kicked up auroras overnight for the northern states and Canada.

At 9:15 p.m. Friday night the aurora laid low in the northern sky. The arc is the curved border of the auroral oval that’s centered on Earth’s geomagnetic pole. Credit: Bob King

The display began and remained a very low arc from end of twilight until around 11 p.m. CDT when it slowly widened and brightened. The Kp index reached “4″ at that time, not quite a G1 geomagnetic storm but certainly pushing the threshold. Then at 12:20 the arc became brighter and more distinct and split into an exquisite set of short, parallel rays like keys on a piano. Faint rays reached halfway to the zenith as patches of aurora flashed on and off below.

Nice long rays stretch over the forest near Duluth, Minnesota U.S. early this Saturday morning September 27, 2014. Credit: Bob King

While modest, the display was active with a steady supply of rays and pulsating patches, but it never expanded beyond the northern half of the northern sky. Coronal hole effects will linger the next two nights, so be on alert for auroras to appear again.

Check out the aurora! It’s on tonight Sept. 23-24

A fine aurora with many small rays spread across the northern sky around 10 p.m. CDT this evening September 23, 2014. Credit: Bob King

If the sky is clear and you live in the northern U.S. the northern lights are visible right now at 10-10:30 p.m. CDT. Not a huge display, but there’s a broad greenish arc/glow across the northern sky streaked with rays that reach up to the North Star. Very pretty.

A few bright rays below the Bowl and Handle of the Big Dipper at 10:15 p.m. Credit: Bob King

No telling how long it might last, but it’s been out at least since 9:30. No storms, not even minor ones, were in the forecast, but there you have it anyway. The Kp index is currently at “4″ just below minor storm level and the direction of the magnetic field bundled with the solar wind has been tipped south (a good direction for linking up with Earth’s field) for about the past 7 hours. Let’s hope it sticks around!

* Update Weds. September 24 – We’re right on the edge tonight with a chance for a minor display of aurora according to the most recent forecast.

Extent of the auroral oval around 10:30 p.m. CDT shows expansion to the south. Notice the view line brushes the northern states. Click to see current oval. Credit: NOAA

Minor aurora alert tonight Sept. 18-19

The auroral oval has expanded south this evening (11:45 p.m. CDT) in response to favorable changes in the solar wind. Observers in northern Minnesota, Maine and other borderland states should be watchful for auroras overnight. Credit: NOAA

Observers in the northern U.S. and southern Canada should be alert for auroras tonight. The direction of the magnetic field has been mostly south for the past 8 hours, providing a nice linkage into Earth’s magnetic bubble. It’s cloudy in Duluth, Minn., but the Ovation oval plot (above) would indicate visible aurora low in the northern sky from northern Minnesota, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and northern Maine around 11-11:30 p.m. CDT.

* Update Friday, Sept. 19 — Minor storming is also possible tonight from higher latitudes in the U.S.

 

What happened to the aurora? / New forecast for tonight Sept. 13-14

Observers in Maine were treated to a very nice aurora early last night September 12th. Mike Taylor saw this “intense aurora” light up above the unused railroad tracks along Unity Pond at 8:38 p.m. Click to see more of Mike’s work. Credit: Mike Taylor

Feeling disappointed in the aurora last night? The storm happened as forecast only it petered out just about the time the sky was getting dark across much of North America. Observers in Maine caught a good show early, and the lights even put in an appearance here in northern Minnesota, albeit low in the north from behind clouds.

The Kp index, an indicator of magnetic disturbances in Earth’s magnetosphere, shot up to “7″ last night before dropping off to low activity, where it’s remained all day so far today. Credit: NOAA

NOAA space weather forecasters call for minor G1 storm tonight September 13 from about 10 pm to 4 a.m. Central Daylight Time tomorrow.

Minor usually means auroras in the bottom half of the northern sky for skywatchers living in the U.S.-Canada borderland region. You may choose to ignore the forecast and go to bed. I understand. You’re feeling a little burned. Those who feel like soldiering on, remain alert for possible auroras.

ACE orbits ahead of Earth toward the sun and can measure the clouds of plasma belted out by the sun about an hour before they arrive at Earth. Credit: NASA

It’s hard to blame NOAA. Predicting the magnetic inclination of a cloud of solar plasma at a distance is fraught with uncertainty. We get a little help from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) which orbits at the L1 libration point, one of five places near Earth where the sun’s and Earth’s gravity are in balance, allowing a satellite placed there to remain relatively stationary. ACE pivots about some 932,000 miles (1.5 million km) from Earth and 92 million miles (148.5 million km) from the sun.

The probe detects the direction, strength and magnetic field particulars of incoming blasts of particles from the sun and provides advance warning of about one hour of dangerous storms. Storms that affect power grids, satellites and of course paint the sky in northern lights. It also measures the magnetic properties of the cloud and relays that data in real time for us to see in the ACE plots.

ACE plot of magnetic field direction or Bz from last night. You can see how the storm dissipated once the magnetic direction of the cloud changed from south (during the storm) to north (above the white horizontal line). Credit: NASA

Yesterday’s big puff of electrons and protons came packaged in a magnetic field that linked into Earth’s  - at first. But later in the evening, the cloud’s magnetic field changed from south to north and was effectively cut off from connecting with our planet’s magnetic bubble. Earth gave it the cold shoulder, and you and I lost some sleep.

After tonight, calmer conditions are expected for a couple days. After that, it’s anyone’s guess. I’ll be watching tonight and report back.

Showtime! Aurora makes first appearance – updated

A diffuse double is seen low in the northern sky at 9:30 p.m. CDT this evening September 11, 2014. The Big Dipper is off to the left. Credit: Bob King

(Scroll down for the latest update)

Just came in from a check on the northern lights and they’re out. Just a quiet start, but I can see a classic green arc low in the northern sky. Once my eyes were dark adapted, faint rays streaked the sky above the arc. No doubt they would have stood out more boldly were it not for the rising gibbous moon off to the east. Stay tuned for more updates during the night.

Faint rays streak either side of this photo taken at 9:35 p.m. Moonlight lowered the contrast but they were dimly visible with the naked eye. Credit: Bob King

Here are some links for you to check out to help you plan through the night:

The approximate extent of the auroral oval forecast for 10:30 p.m. CDT from Ovation. Credit: NOAA

* Ovation oval – shows the approximate extent of the auroral oval that looks like a cap centered on Earth’s geomagnetic pole. During storms, the oval extends south into the northern U.S. and farther.

* Kp index – indicator of magnetic activity high overhead and updated every three hours. A Kp index of “5″ means the onset of a minor storm; a Kp of “6″, a moderate storm.

* NOAA space weather forecast

* Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite plots - The magnetic field direction of the arriving wind from the sun. The topmost graph, plotting Bz, is your friend. When it drops into the negative zone that’s good! A prolonged stay at -10 or lower increases the chance of seeing the aurora.

* UPDATE 8:15 a.m. Saturday Sept. 13: Well, well, well. Yes, the effects of the solar blast did arrive and we did experience a G3 storm, only the best part happened before nightfall had settled over the U.S. and southern Canada. The peak was also fairly brief. All those arriving protons and electrons connected for a time with Earth’s magnetic field but then disconnected, leaving us with a weak storm for much of the rest of the night. More activity is expected tonight but the forecast calls for a lesser G1 geomagnetic storm.

* UPDATE 10:30 p.m. : Although the aurora has died back, I just got the NOAA forecast update which still calls for a strong storm overnight. Crossing my fingers it happens.

Graph of Bz from the ACE spacecraft shows the past 24 hours of solar wind direction changes. Far right is 11 p.m. CDT Credit: NOAA

* UPDATE 9:30 p.m. : Definite aurora seen through breaks in the clouds low in the northern sky here in Duluth, Minn. After a big surge late this afternoon and during early evening, activity’s temporarily dropped off. The ACE plot has “gone north”. Will keep tabs and report back.

UPDATE Friday 7:30 p.m September 12: Wow! Kp=7 (G3 storm). Auroras should be visible now over the far eastern seaboard of Canada including New Brunswick and the Gaspe Peninsula. If I were a betting man, folks in Maine should see at least a low, glowing arc in the northern sky. Still dusk here in Duluth.

UPDATE Friday 3 p.m.: The Kp index is now at “5″ or minor storm. If you live in the Scandinavian countries or Iceland, you’re getting a very good show right now.

* UPDATE Friday 9 a.m. September 12: Auroras did appear as forecast overnight beginning at nightfall and continuing through about 1 a.m. this morning. Then the action stopped. The Kp index reached “5″ during that time leading to a G1 or minor geomagnetic storm. It wasn’t a particularly bright aurora, remained low in the northern sky and had to compete with moonlight, so many of you may not have seen it.

The stronger G3 geomagnetic storm from the second and more Earth-directed solar blast is still forecast for tonight. This should bring a much better display and should begin right at nightfall. Peak is expected between 10 p.m. and 1 a.m. Central Daylight Time.

My forecast is good, so I’ll be updating during the night. Good luck and clear skies!

Twin solar storms may stoke auroras tonight Sept. 11-12

A CME or coronal mass ejection from the sun on September 9 is expected to pass Earth later today and possibly spark auroras tonight. Credit: NASA/ESA

(Click HERE for updates))

Two bursts of solar particles propelled by flares on September 9th and 10th are expected to arrive starting tonight and possibly touch off a moderate G2 geomagnetic storm. Translation: auroras may bloom in the next few nights!

A moderate M4 flare occurred early on September 9th followed by a more powerful X1.6 yesterday afternoon. Provided the magnetic field the particles come packaged in points in the right direction – south – these bursts have good potential for creating auroras tonight and again over the weekend.

A second, Earth-directed CME leaves the sun in the wake of the X1.6 flare on September 10th. Credit: NASA/ESA

The timing is good because the moon is past full and won’t be too bright. During a moderate storm, auroras are often seen across the northern tier of states and Canada. According to the latest NOAA space weather forecast, activity should kick up but remain shy of storm level from 9 p.m.-midnight Central Daylight Time tonight September 11th.

The brunt of the storm is expected from 1-4 a.m. tomorrow morning the 12th with effects lasting until 7 a.m.

This may only be the start of an even stronger storm anticipated Friday night and continuing into the weekend beginning from yesterday’s flare. That one blasted material directly toward Earth. Always a good omen for auroras.

Earth’s magnetic bubble, generated by motions within its iron-nickel core and shaped by the solar wind, is called the magnetosphere. It extends some 40,000 miles forward of the planet and more than 3.9 million miles in the tailward direction. Credit: NASA

As always with northern lights, keep in mind they’re fickle. Most of the time, Earth’s magnetic defense – a humongous, teardrop-shaped bubble of magnetism called the magnetosphere –  acts as a bulwark against strong solar winds, letting them slide by harmlessly. We’ll see what happens on this round, but I’m optimistic.

The Earth weather forecast for my locale is mostly clear tonight, so I’ll be monitoring the sky. Stop back later for an update.

* UPDATE 9 p.m. CDT: Quiet so far. Auroras still holed up in Hudson Bay and Quebec. The magnetic field direction of the arriving wind from the sun shows a lot of variation (see ACE satellite plot, topmost graph showing Bz) rising and falling from positive to negative. Negative is good! A prolonged stay at -10 or lower increase the chance of seeing the aurora.