Perseid Meteor Shower Will Still Be Active Sunday Night

Too bad the clouds moved in! I had clear skies until about 11 p.m. and saw some great Perseid meteors from 10:15 until that time. It’s never easy to capture meteors with a camera, but I had a gut feeling I’d get one on my first exposure — and it happened! The meteor glowed orange…
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Iridium Satellites Keep The Fireworks Coming … But Not Forever

The crackle of firecrackers and thump of cannons echoed through the neighborhood last night, the fourth of July. But a whole different kind of fireworks was happening 483 miles overhead — silent but showy flares from Iridium satellites. The Iridium extravaganza’s been going on every night somewhere on Earth since the mid-1990s. A quick check of what…
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New GOES-16 Weather Satellite Beams Back Beautiful (And Useful) Photos Of Earth

Next generation weather forecasting made its debut this week in NASA’s brand new GOES-16 satellite. The new bird takes high-resolution images of Earth in up to sixteen different colors (wavelengths) of light with its Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). “High resolution imagery from GOES-16 will provide sharper and more detailed views of hazardous weather systems and reveal…
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Aurora — The Big Picture From 518 Miles Up

What an amazing image! Those cresting wave forms? That’s the aurora seen from 518 miles up by the Suomi-NPP satellite. An intense display lit up the sky across northern Canada on Dec. 22 just hours after the winter solstice, when a mass of energetic particles from the sun smashed into Earth’s magnetic field and funneled down to…
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Cosmic Rays Are Beating Up On Key Space Weather Satellite

Our finest tool for warning us of impending solar storms has been having a tough go since it was launched in 2015. Galactic cosmic rays may be to blame. NASA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) hangs its hat at the L1 Lagrange Point, a handy parking spot where the gravitational pulls of the Earth and sun cancel out.…
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