The Planets And Moon Have Something Nice In Store

Earlier this morning, Mars and Mercury passed very close to one another low in the eastern sky at dawn. Sunday morning (Sept. 17), they’ll still be just ½° apart and preceded by the star Regulus, planet Venus and the crescent moon.  It gets even better on the 18th, when the moon, now sliver-thin, resides like a…
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Cassini’s Death Dive Into Saturn Imminent

NASA’s 13-year Cassini mission at Saturn ends Friday. At 5:31 a.m. CDT, Cassini will enter Saturn’s atmosphere, and by 7 a.m., after traveling 932 million miles and 83 minutes, its final bit of data will reach mission control. Then silence. In the remaining days, its mission status will be updated here. The following list includes news conferences and…
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T-Minus 20 Days: Cassini Keeps Opening Our Eyes

You’d think by now we’d know exactly how long a day is on Saturn, but Cassini’s still working on it. On a terrestrial planet, you can time when a landmark cycles back around, but Saturn’s covered in clouds, so  pinning down the day has been tricky. That’s why Cassini has been looking closely at Saturn’s…
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Night Sky On The Fourth Of July

Today we celebrate American Independence Day, when lots of us will be out watching fireworks displays at dusk. Since getting a good seat means arriving early, you might have a little time on your hands to look around and take in the stars before the show begins. Or even after the show. Assuming a forecast…
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See Saturn, Find Milky Way Treasure

Saturn is the brightest object in the southern sky at nightfall at the moment. It forms a very wide pair with Antares,  a bright, red-hued star one magnitude fainter than Saturn. At 11 p.m. local daylight time, Antares stands due south with Saturn a fist and a half (15°) to its east or left. The bright planets…
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